Projects

 

Recent Programming

 

Joanie4Jackie4Ever @ Interference Archive

131 8TH STREET NO. 4
BROOKLYN, NY 11215 (Gowanus)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“Joanie4Jackie4Ever”

Organized by Mary Billyou, Chris Bravo, Mark Lukenbill, and Paris McGarry

November 4, 2016–January 15, 2017

Interference Archive is pleased to present “Joanie4Jackie4Ever,” two screenings and an installation featuring the work of Cozette Carroll, Dulcie Clarkson, Kerthy Fix, Dara Greenwald, K8 Hardy, Vanessa Haroutunian, Kara Herold, Sarah Jacobson, Sarah Kennedy, Shannon Kringen, Penny Lane, Rohesia Hamilton Metcalfe, Satvia Peterson, Vanessa Renwick, Emily Richardson, Tina Spangler, Deborah Stratman and Cat Tyc.

“A Challenge And A Promise.” – Joanie4Jackie

During the first weekend of November at Interference Archive, as part of the larger project We Are What We Archive, “pure&magicalpussypower,”  and “Joanie4Jackie4Ever” will be screened. Throughout the fall, two monitors in the Archive will present looping programs culled from the Joanie4Jackie Chainletter project. “Joanie4Jackie4Ever” is included in Interference’s current series of micro-exhibits highlighting lesser-known –yet essential– objects in the archive’s collection. Joanie4Jackie is a VHS distribution project of short work by women, conceived by filmmaker Miranda July in 1995. Born out of the cultural movement of Riot Grrrl conventions and cheap fanzine production, Joanie4Jackie was developed before the internet and its characteristic peer-to-peer file exchange. The project supported communication and connections between female media makers across the United States. Every participant received a compilation Chainletter in which their video was contextualized with ten other filmmakers’ work. No submission was rejected. Effectively, each Chainletter became a mix-tape of films produced by women mostly unknown to each other. Emphasizing exchange, access, and affinity between producers, this collective production heralded innovative formations of new media, such as the Creative Commons.

November 4th, 7pm: A roundtable discussion with Joanie4Jackie filmmakers, archivists and organizers. To be preceded by a screening of pure&magicalpussypower, a J4J documentary, by director Vanessa Haroutunian. This is an opportunity to hear first-hand accounts from the people who contributed, supported, and built the J4J project. Participants include: Mary Billyou, Chris Bravo, Kerthy Fix, Vanessa Haroutunian, Paris McGarry, Tina Spangler and Cat Tyc.

November 5th, 7pm: Joanie4Jackie4Ever

Experience a Chainletter as it was originally viewed! Introducing the screening will be an authentic Joanie4Jackie title sequence made by the artist K8 Hardy. Filmmakers will be in attendance.

Ongoing from November 4th–January 15th: Selections from the entire collection of Joanie4Jackie Chainletters will available at a viewing station in Interference Archive. Also on display will be paper ephemera and videos from Tina Spangler’s collection, including copies of her zine Femme Flicke. In addition, Joanie4Jackie filmmakers’ zines will also be presented.

Archive hours: Thursdays 1pm–9pm, Fridays–Sundays 12pm–5pm

Location: 131 8th St. #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215

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j4j4ever

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co-organized with Mark Lukenbill, Paris McGarry, and Chris Bravo.

Stills (left to right, top to bottom) from The Slow Escape by Sativa Peterson, “X” and the Woman by Cozette Carroll, La Blanchisseuse by Rohesia Hamilton Metcalfe, Puppet Girl by Dara Greenwald, Grrrlyshow by Kara Herold, Untied by Deborah Stratman, Intro to The Cherry Cherry Chainletter by K8 Hardy, Furness by Cat Tyc.

 

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Past Projects
In April, with the help of Councilmember Meredith Crowley, Rosemary’s Playground Received
$3.2 million in budgetary funds for renovation!!

 

 

Let’s Fix Rosemary’s Playground / Friends of Rosemary’s Playground

 

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My prompt for the Critical Practices Round Table on Oct. 30th, 2014:

On Post-Work and The Citizen Artist

In Post-Fordist society, the nature of work has shifted radically from unionized work-weeks to the “flexible” freelance economy, where standard hours are now obsolete, and “play” and “work” meet closer every day. Meanwhile, MFA programs are proliferating, adjunct faculty members must live on food stamps, and involuntary data providers constantly “share” on Facebook. The educated underemployed have played a role in society since the demise of the British Empire, and we are visible again today in the urban process of gentrification (only to be priced out ourselves in the end). Our precarious experience can be one of real suffering, and can lead to vocal protests like Occupy Wall Street, Paris in 1968, and the Italian Worker/Student movement of the 1960s. Is Guaranteed Annual Income the answer? If not, what could be?

 

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Round Robin Collective

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On the Alternative Art Space Movement in NYC

 

LIVE/WORK SPACE @ Camel Art Space, 2011

 

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The Free Translators

 

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Future Yonder at Hudson Franklin

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Past Programming

40 Rue Quincampoix, 75004 Paris, France
Friday, June 26
at 7:30pm
19h30 | Mary Billyou
Un désert meurtrier de Maisons: Un programme organisée par Mary Billyou
Le Consentement, accessoire essentiel de l’économie néolibérale, a produit (avec le
développement des banlieues) la mélancolie collective et le racisme institutionnel. Les films de
ce programme nous guident à travers des mondes distingués et marginaux, à la fois imaginaire
et réel, à l’intérieur et à l’exterieur des barrières communautaires où les questions persistent
dans la similitude. (MB)

A Murderous Desert of Houses: A Program Curated by Mary Billyou
Consent, an essential prop of neoliberal economics, has produced, along with suburban development, collective melancholia and institutional racism. How does the legacy of separatism affect current ideas of difference? The films in this program guide us through genteel and marginal worlds, both imaginary and real, within and without community gates, where questions linger amongst the sameness. (MB)

 

30–30 Vision

 

On the Contrary